Direct to Consumer Shipping

Distilled Spirits & Direct to Consumer

Can I buy my favorite distilled spirits online and conveniently ship them directly to me?

In most places in the United States, the answer is NO.

Why?

Currently, consumers are prohibited from buying spirits and shipping them to “direct to consumer” due to the three-tier system, established after the end of Prohibition. The three-tier system is incredibly important for the distilled spirits industry as a whole, as manufacturers provide alcoholic products to wholesalers, who distribute the products to retailers, who sell to the consumers.

However, the world has evolved digitally. Adult, responsible consumers like you want to be able to easily buy your favorite spirits online and have them conveniently shipped directly to you.

Spirits United is fully supportive of the three-tier system co-existing with direct to consumer shipping. This is already exemplified by the wine industry which is allowed to ship directly to consumer in 46 states.

Loyal spirits consumers of legal drinking age should be allowed the same customer convenience with direct to consumer shipping of their favorite spirits.

How can you make a difference?

Check out the map below. Do you live in a state that does not allow for direct to consumer shipping?

Join Spirits United TODAY to stay updated on the latest news and campaigns related to modernizing direct to consumer laws and regulations.

  • Alaska allows out-of-state suppliers to ship alcohol beverages directly to in-state adult consumers for personal use and not for resale. There is no state regulation, but a number of localities prohibit importation or possession.
  • Arizona allows in-state and out-of-state distillers holding an Arizona craft distiller license to sell and deliver spirits directly to in-state adults for their personal use and not for resale.
  • Connecticut allows in-state adult consumers holding a Connecticut permit to import alcohol beverages purchased from within or outside of the U.S. for their own consumption, subject to quantity limits and a requirement to first deliver the product to a distributor.
  • Hawaii allows in-state adult consumers holding a Hawaii permit to receive a shipment of alcohol beverages from outside the state if the product is otherwise unavailable in the state, subject to quantity limits.
  • Kentucky allows in-state and out-of-state alcohol beverage producers and suppliers, including importers of non-U.S. product, holding a Kentucky direct ship license to sell and have product shipped directly to in-state adult consumers in localities allowing sales, for personal use and not for resale, subject to quantity limits.
  • Nebraska allows out-of-state manufacturers holding a Nebraska direct ship license to sell and ship alcohol beverages directly to in-state adult consumers for personal use and not for resale, subject to quantity limits.   
  • Nevada allows in-state adult consumers to import alcohol beverages, including U.S. and non-U.S. product, from an out-state supplier holding a Nevada certificate of compliance, if for personal use and not for resale, and subject to quantity limits.
  • New Hampshire allows producers and importers holding a N.H. direct shipper permit to sell and ship alcohol beverages directly to in-state adult consumers in localities allowing sales, subject to quantity limits. 
  • North Dakota allows producers holding a N.D. direct shipper license to sell and ship alcohol beverages directly to in-state adult consumers for personal use and not for resale, subject to quantity limits.
  • Rhode Island allows an adult in-state consumer to personally order at a manufacturer’s premise for shipment to Rhode Island.
  • Washington, D.C. allows a carrier to transport alcohol beverages to an adult consumer in the District without any permit or license, subject to quantity limits.

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